RSS 2.0 Feed

» Welcome Guest Log In :: Register

    
  Topic: Bertie and Jeeves< Next Oldest | Next Newest >  
stevestory



Posts: 10127
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 04 2006,14:43   

When at the second-worst Barnes and Noble in the world this afternoon, at the Southpoint Mall in Durham, I picked up Jeeves in the Morning, having heard great things about Wodehouse by people such as Hitchens. I wasn't sure which one to start with, but they all looked somewhat self-contained, so I picked the cheapest one.

Anybody here a Wodehouse fan? Any recommendations?

   
MidnightVoice



Posts: 380
Joined: Aug. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 05 2006,13:20   

I enjoyed them when I was young.  They are terribly dated, but enjoyable.

Start with the early ones?

--------------
If I fly the coop some time
And take nothing but a grip
With the few good books that really count
It's a necessary trip

I'll be gone with the girl in the gold silk jacket
The girl with the pearl-driller's hands

  
Arden Chatfield



Posts: 6657
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 05 2006,14:20   

Where's the worst Barnes and Noble? And why is it the worst?

--------------
"Rich is just mad because he thought all titties had fur on them until last week when a shorn transvestite ruined his childhood dreams by jumping out of a spider man cake and man boobing him in the face lips." - Erasmus

  
stevestory



Posts: 10127
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 05 2006,14:46   

the worst one i've ever been to, is that one at Southpoint. The employees never pick up the phone, their science section is smaller than the one in my apartment, and there are never fewer than 20 people in line at the cafe.

When I called it second worst, I was merely leaving room for the possible existence of a Barnes and Noble in the Sudan, or maybe downtown Baghdad. ;-)

   
Rilke's Granddaughter



Posts: 311
Joined: Jan. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 05 2006,18:48   

Quote (stevestory @ Mar. 04 2006,20:43)
When at the second-worst Barnes and Noble in the world this afternoon, at the Southpoint Mall in Durham, I picked up Jeeves in the Morning, having heard great things about Wodehouse by people such as Hitchens. I wasn't sure which one to start with, but they all looked somewhat self-contained, so I picked the cheapest one.

Anybody here a Wodehouse fan? Any recommendations?

Oddly enough, "Joy in the Morning" is one of the very finest B&J; if you don't like that, you won't like anything else.  "Uncle Fred in the Springtime" is also superb, as are some of the golf story collections.

And being 'dated' is part of the charm.

Perhaps you can tell I'm a fan?  :)

  
Louis



Posts: 6436
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 05 2006,20:44   

Colour me a huge fan of all things Wodehousian. Went to school with a granddaughter/grandniece of Plum, can't remember which. (Not sure if he had direct descendants, might have been a step grand whatsit).

Joy in the Morning is sublime. I also love Aunt's aren't Gentlemen. The Totleigh Towers/Cow creamer sagas can get a touch repetative, but (perhaps ironically) they contain some of the greatest witicisms ever penned by mortal man. The great man once said of his works that some people write serious novels about terrible topics, but that he writes a sort of musical comedy. Best viewed in that light.

It may help our less culturally fortunate friends (that would be you Americans and other sundry foreigners*) to note that the "gentleman" was a genuine class of chap in the late 19th early 20th century, particularly the period inter bellum. They sadly seem to have lived and died with spats. As proper foot attire arose, so did the gentleman, and with it he perished. The gentleman was typically the second or third son, or perhaps even nephew, of a monied aristocrat or tycoon. Not quite up to the elder brother's standards and at a bit of a loose end these lesser siblings were handed an allowance and left to their own devices, rarely having to justify their existance with something as vulgar as actual work.

Britannia in all her glory is now sadly denuded of the rakishly attired young gentleman. We've replaced them with football hooligans, chavs, and the ghastly "celebrity". Yuck. Mind you, that is progress!

Louis

* Was it Kipling who said "Thank God, for you have won the great lottery of life by being born an Englishman!"?**

** I am actually joking about this little piece of jingoistic nonsense. I don't think the British (particularly the English) are better than you lovely ex-colonials and personages of alternative nationality. This is what we over here call "humour". Just thought I'd make it clear ;-) in case we had some sensitive souls reading.

--------------
Bye.

  
Sheikh Mahandi



Posts: 47
Joined: May 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 06 2006,01:21   

I always preferred Tom Sharpe myself, "Riotous Assembly", "Indecent Exposure", "The Throwback", all of the "Wilt" series.
If only there was a satirist of his calibre to write about ID, and fundamentalism.
:D

--------------
"Love is in the air, everywhere I look around,.....Love is in the air, every sight and every sound,......"

  
Louis



Posts: 6436
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 06 2006,01:46   

I wouldn't say I prefered the works of T. Sharpe Esq., but I enjoy them equally for different reasons.

Louis

--------------
Bye.

  
Julie Stahlhut



Posts: 46
Joined: July 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 06 2006,03:21   

I've only read a few of the original stories, but vastly enjoyed the Jeeves and Wooster TV series with Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie. I rented the whole thing, one disc at a time, through Netflix.  Yes, it's essentially a one-joke story, and maybe it's even more so when adapted for TV, but Fry and Laurie are, as usual, too much fun!  Some viewers complained that Stephen Fry was too young for the part of Jeeves -- he was, I think, 33 when the series began, and is not made up to look older.  IMO, though, Fry is one of the most age-neutral actors around, and he and Hugh Laurie were always perfect together!

  
stevestory



Posts: 10127
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 06 2006,04:03   

Hmm. apparently 'joy in the morning' and 'jeeves in the morning' are two titles for the same book.

I have to say, as I sat down to read it this weekend I was enchanted from the first sentence:

"After the thing was all over, when peril had ceased to loom, and happy endings had been distributed in heaping handfuls..."

   
stevestory



Posts: 10127
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 06 2006,04:06   

Quote
"Science is a way of trying not to fool yourself. The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool."

R P Feynman
It's a little known fact that Feynman was looking at Dave Springer when he said this.

   
BWE



Posts: 1898
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 06 2006,09:07   

Quote
This is what we over here call "humour".


Hmmm. America. We took the "U" out of humor.

Of course, We also took the "U" out of labor.

--------------
Who said that ev'ry wish would be heard and answered
When wished on the morning star
Somebody thought of that, and someone believed it
Look what it's done so far

The Daily Wingnut

   
MidnightVoice



Posts: 380
Joined: Aug. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 07 2006,03:06   

Quote (Sheikh Mahandi @ Mar. 06 2006,07:21)
I always preferred Tom Sharpe myself, "Riotous Assembly", "Indecent Exposure", "The Throwback", all of the "Wilt" series.
If only there was a satirist of his calibre to write about ID, and fundamentalism.
:D

Wilt is one of the funniest books I have ever read.  Riotous Assembly and Indecent Exposure come a close second and third.  :D

--------------
If I fly the coop some time
And take nothing but a grip
With the few good books that really count
It's a necessary trip

I'll be gone with the girl in the gold silk jacket
The girl with the pearl-driller's hands

  
  12 replies since Mar. 04 2006,14:43 < Next Oldest | Next Newest >  

    


Track this topic Email this topic Print this topic

[ Read the Board Rules ] | [Useful Links] | [Evolving Designs]