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The Critic's Resource on AntiEvolution

NCSE Evolution and Climate Education Update for 2012/07/20

(by NCSE Deputy Director Glenn Branch)

Dear Friends of NCSE,

A new issue of Evolution: Education and Outreach and a preview of How
We Know What We Know About Our Changing Climate.


The latest issue of Evolution: Education and Outreach -- the new
journal promoting the accurate understanding and comprehensive
teaching of evolutionary theory for a wide audience -- is now
published. The theme for the issue (volume 5, number 2) is
evolutionary developmental biology, edited by Katherine E. Willmore.
Articles include "An Introduction to Evolutionary Developmental
Biology"; "Evolutionary Developmental Biology (Evo-Devo): Past,
Present, and Future"; "The Intelligent Egg, and How It Got That Way:
From Genes to Genius in a Few Easy Lessons"; "Heterochrony: The
Evolution of Development"; "The Body Plan Concept and Its Centrality
in Evo-Devo"; and "Coming to Grips with Evolvability." Plus there are
various articles on the teaching of evolution, book reviews, and

Also included is the latest installment of NCSE's regular column,
Overcoming Obstacles to Evolution Education. In "Evolution by
Squinches," NCSE's deputy director Glenn Branch reviews Jay Hosler's
Evolution: The Story of Life on Earth (Hill and Wang, 2012). "In the
far future, or perhaps on a forbidden, doomed, and/or cubical planet,
or possibly in a strange parallel dimension, cartoons and comics are,
without exception, biologically accurate," Branch writes. "And there,
of course, it would seem strange and unnecessary to applaud a book
like Evolution: The Story of Life on Earth for the altogether mundane
achievement of providing a lively, accurate, and delightful
explanation of evolution in the form of a graphic novel. Here, on the
other hand, the applause is entirely in order."

For the issue of Evolution: Education and Outreach, visit: 

For Branch's review (subscription required), visit: 


NCSE is pleased to offer a free preview of Lynne Cherry and Gary
Braasch's How We Know What We Know About Our Changing Climate:
Scientists and Kids Explore Global Warming (Dawn Publications, 2008),
a book on climate change aimed at readers in grades 4 through 8. The
preview consists of a discussion of how scientists -- and kids! -- are
investigating changes in bird migration and flower budding in response
to climate change, as well as a discussion of the reader's "climate
footprint" ("the amount of carbon dioxide and greenhouse gases you
create as you go about your life day to day") and ways to minimize it.

The reviewer for School Library Journal wrote, in a starred review,
"Cherry and Braasch introduce readers to scientists around the world
whose research contributes to an understanding of the causes and
consequences of global warming. They also describe the work of citizen
scientists, including children, whose observations contribute to
knowledge about important changes that are occurring. ... The book's
wide-ranging exploration of scientific studies and the encouragement
to people of every age to become citizen scientists and active
participants for change make this a valuable purchase."

For the preview of How We Know What We Know About Our Changing Climate
(PDF), visit: 

For information about the book from its publisher, visit: 

Thanks for reading. And don't forget to visit NCSE's website -- -- where you can always find the latest news on 
evolution and climate education and threats to them.


Glenn Branch
Deputy Director
National Center for Science Education, Inc.
420 40th Street, Suite 2
Oakland, CA 94609-2509
510-601-7203 x305
fax: 510-601-7204

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