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  Topic: Cool Animals Past and Present, Present Your Favourites< Next Oldest | Next Newest >  
The Ghost of Paley



Posts: 1703
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 19 2007,14:23   

This may be old hat to many of you, but I found this cool video on the lyrebird. The chainsaw noises are incredible (assuming somebody's not having fun with the viewers).

Here's some background info:

   
Quote
A Lyrebird is either of two species of ground-dwelling Australian birds, most notable for their extraordinary ability to mimic natural and artificial sounds from their environment. They are the:

Superb Lyrebird or Weringerong (Menura novaehollandiae) is found in areas of wet forest in Victoria and New South Wales, and in Tasmania where it was introduced in the 19th Century. Females are 74-84cm long, and the males are a larger 80-98cm long — making them the third-largest passerine bird after the Thick-billed Raven and the Common Raven. Many Superb Lyrebirds live in the Dandenong Ranges National Park and Kinglake National Park around Melbourne, and in several other parks along the east coast of Australia.
Albert's Lyrebird (Menura alberti) is slightly smaller at a maximum of 90 cm (male) and 84 cm (female) (around 30-35 inches) and is only found in a very small area of Southern Queensland rainforest. They have smaller, less spectacular lyrate feathers than the Superb Lyrebird, but are otherwise similar. Albert's Lyrebird was named in honour of Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.
Lyrebirds are among Australia's best-known native birds, even though they are rarely seen in their natural habitat. As well as their extraordinary mimicking ability, lyrebirds are notable because of the striking beauty of the male bird's huge tail when it is fanned out in display; and also because of their courtship display.
[...]
A lyrebird's call is a rich mixture of its own song and any number of other sounds it has heard. The lyrebird's syrinx is the most complexly-muscled of the Passerines (songbirds), giving the lyrebird extraordinary ability, unmatched in vocal repertoire and mimicry. Lyrebirds render with great fidelity the individual songs of other birds and the chatter of flocks of birds, and also mimic other animals, human noises, machinery of all kinds, explosions and musical instruments. The lyrebird is capable of imitating almost any sound — from a mill whistle to a cross-cut saw, and, not uncommonly, sounds as diverse as chainsaws [2], car engines and alarms, rifle-shots, camera shutters, dogs barking and crying babies. Lyrebirds are shy birds and a constant stream of bird calls coming from one place is often the only way of identifying them and their presence. The female lyrebird is also an excellent mimic, but she is not heard as often as the male lyrebird [3] [4] [5]

One researcher, Sydney Curtis, has recorded flute-like lyrebird calls in the vicinity of the New England National Park. Similarly, in 1969, a park ranger, Neville Fenton, recorded a lyrebird song, which resembled flute sounds, in the New England National Park, near Dorrigo in northern coastal New South Wales. After much detective work by Fenton, it was discovered that in the 1930's, a flute player living on a farm adjoining the park used to play tunes near his pet lyrebird. The lyrebird adopted the tunes into his repertoire, and retained them after release into the park. Neville Fenton forwarded a tape of his recording to Norman Robinson. Because a lyrebird is able to carry two tunes at the same time, Robinson filtered out one of the tunes and put it on the phonograph for the purposes of analysis. The song represents a modified version of two popular tunes in the 1930's: "The Keel Row" and "Mosquito's Dance". Musicologist David Rothenberg has endorsed this information. [6] [7] [8]


Amazing stuff! Apparently they get their name from the shape of their tail rather than their song.



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Dey can't 'andle my riddim.

  
jeannot



Posts: 1200
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 19 2007,14:59   

I saw this video before and I thought it was a fake.

  
Mike PSS



Posts: 428
Joined: Sep. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 19 2007,15:33   

Quote (jeannot @ Jan. 19 2007,15:59)
I saw this video before and I thought it was a fake.

Are you calling Richard Attenborough a fake? :O

Careful jeannot, or the cross-channel mud-slinging will commence.  ;)

  
The Ghost of Paley



Posts: 1703
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 19 2007,15:37   

Are some of the sounds faked? The camera cuts around the chainsaw noise are a little suspicious, and I wouldn't think a bird's syrinx could produce a sound with such resonance and power, but I don't know.....some birds can do some pretty amazing things when they sing.

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Dey can't 'andle my riddim.

  
The Ghost of Paley



Posts: 1703
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 19 2007,15:42   

Quote
Careful jeannot, or the cross-channel mud-slinging will commence.


FIGHT! FIGHT! FIGHT!

Maybe this can prelim for the SteveStory/Stephen Elliot kickboxing match?

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Dey can't 'andle my riddim.

  
bystander



Posts: 301
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 19 2007,17:04   

It's true. We have some Lyre Birds in the hills behind my home and they can make a great assortment of calls. Friends of mine had a cockie which makes a perfect imitation of their telephone. Something about Aussie birds I guess although I have more interest in the other type (especially as it is now summer).

  
The Ghost of Paley



Posts: 1703
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 20 2007,10:56   

Australia has some very interesting creatures. I could probably devote 100 pages to that region alone.....

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Dey can't 'andle my riddim.

  
Stephen Elliott



Posts: 1754
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 20 2007,12:33   

Quote (Mike PSS @ Jan. 19 2007,15:33)
Quote (jeannot @ Jan. 19 2007,15:59)
I saw this video before and I thought it was a fake.

Are you calling Richard Attenborough a fake? :O

Careful jeannot, or the cross-channel mud-slinging will commence.  ;)

I agree with the sentiment but don't you mean Sir David Attenborough?

Here he is again on crows. Fascinating stuff.

http://video.google.com/videopl....borough

Man that dude has made some amazing TV. We are lucky to have him.

  
Mike PSS



Posts: 428
Joined: Sep. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 20 2007,14:15   

Quote (Stephen Elliott @ Jan. 20 2007,13:33)
Quote (Mike PSS @ Jan. 19 2007,15:33)
 
Quote (jeannot @ Jan. 19 2007,15:59)
I saw this video before and I thought it was a fake.

Are you calling Richard Attenborough a fake? :O

Careful jeannot, or the cross-channel mud-slinging will commence.  ;)

I agree with the sentiment but don't you mean Sir David Attenborough?

Here he is again on crows. Fascinating stuff.

http://video.google.com/videopl....borough

Man that dude has made some amazing TV. We are lucky to have him.

Im a 'Murican.  I donch care how you prunownce hish name.

Yoos new who I was talkin bout anyway.

(why does awful American slang sound like your drunk...
Ohhhhh....  Hahaha.... answered my own question there)

  
Stephen Elliott



Posts: 1754
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 20 2007,14:30   

Quote (Mike PSS @ Jan. 20 2007,14:15)
Im a 'Murican.  I donch care how you prunownce hish name.

Yoos new who I was talkin bout anyway.

(why does awful American slang sound like your drunk...
Ohhhhh....  Hahaha.... answered my own question there)

Yes, I knew who you was talking about. I was just being a smart arse. I get the brothers Richard and David mixed up myself sometimes.

They are both very talented.

TBH, I just happened to have David's book Life in the Undergrowth in front of me.

In the UK we do tend to be quite proud of the quality of nature programmes made by David. Well, those of us that enjoy that quality of programme anyway. We do have a few that would prefer the money spent on "reality TV" crap.

  
Steviepinhead



Posts: 532
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 20 2007,18:03   

Deleted post that didn't work.

I can't seem to get the image links to work.  I find a nice image somewhere online, hit properties just like for the avatar, copy the image link thingy, starting with "http" and ending with "jpg," stick the same in between square-bracketed "i" and slash-"i" and hit the post button.

And all I see is the code, not the image.  WTF?  Any advice...  Is there a maximum length for the image tag?

Further edit: in case it helps with the diagnosis, here's the code that, even though properly "i"-bracketed, wouldn't post as an image: http://anthromuseum.missouri.edu/images....00.jpg.

Thanks, Stevie

  
bystander



Posts: 301
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 20 2007,19:29   

One of the best things I have noticed about Attenborough's documentaries is that he constantly mentions the word evolution and millions of years. It must drive the creo's crazy.

  
Henry J



Posts: 4565
Joined: Mar. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 20 2007,20:03   



Steviepinhead,
Well, it worked in the preview screen for me. Now I'll see if it posts.

I do notice that in the above post it has a trailing period that it thinks is part of the url, and that prevents linking directly from the link in that post. (I had to copy/paste the address and chop off the period to see the thing.)

Btw, that looks rather too large for an avatar.

Henry

  
Steviepinhead



Posts: 532
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 20 2007,20:12   



Let's see if it works for me!  Ah, yes!  Thanks, Henry, I didn't want it for an avatar, just as a cool "old" animal!  These Mississippian shell pieces are something I'm drenching myself in at the moment (it's all Crabby's fault...), though this particular gorget is thought to be more Hopewell or Adena.

Maybe I should add that this design comes from an Indian gorget dug up in the American midwest.  IOW, around 1,000 years ago, there were jaguars (or ocelots) roaming the Mississippi bottomlands.  Which I thought was kinda cool.

  
Stephen Elliott



Posts: 1754
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 20 2007,22:58   

Quote (bystander @ Jan. 20 2007,19:29)
One of the best things I have noticed about Attenborough's documentaries is that he constantly mentions the word evolution and millions of years. It must drive the creo's crazy.

Well he tries to educate with his shows rather than scam people.

  
Louis



Posts: 6436
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 21 2007,04:50   

Ah yes fave animals. Such a topic.

Here are few of my "faves":



The English Pointer. These are becoming rarer. We will soon be POINTLESS, or is that pointerless?



Here is a jellyfish. Note that it is SPINELESS AND TRANSPARENT.



The Poule de Bresse, a proud and interesting bird, these are examples of the male of the breed or COCK.



The octopus with it's eight arms adapted for SUCKING.



And last but not least the Liar bird (properly spelt). Legend has it to never trust a LIAR.

Louis

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Bye.

  
Altabin



Posts: 308
Joined: Sep. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 21 2007,09:26   

Quote (Stephen Elliott @ Jan. 20 2007,19:33)
Quote (Mike PSS @ Jan. 19 2007,15:33)
 
Quote (jeannot @ Jan. 19 2007,15:59)
I saw this video before and I thought it was a fake.

Are you calling Richard Attenborough a fake? :O

Careful jeannot, or the cross-channel mud-slinging will commence.  ;)

I agree with the sentiment but don't you mean Sir David Attenborough?

Here he is again on crows. Fascinating stuff.

http://video.google.com/videopl....borough

Man that dude has made some amazing TV. We are lucky to have him.

Poking around Google video, I find that the whole of Life on Earth has been uploaded there.  I haven't seen that since I was a kid - and it's all but impossible to get a (hard)copy of the video!  I plan a nostalgic viewing of the whole series over the next week.

--------------

  
Stephen Elliott



Posts: 1754
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 21 2007,16:06   

Quote (Altabin @ Jan. 21 2007,09:26)
Poking around Google video, I find that the whole of Life on Earth has been uploaded there.  I haven't seen that since I was a kid - and it's all but impossible to get a (hard)copy of the video!  I plan a nostalgic viewing of the whole series over the next week.

Just watched 2 hours of him on BBC1. The 1st hour was about filming a calf widebeast. The second hour was about climate change effects. Both programmes where very interesting.

These programmes are why I do not object to the licence fee. Meanwhile on other channels we have "popular" (read cheap) TV.

  
The Ghost of Paley



Posts: 1703
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 22 2007,11:30   

Speaking of jellyfish (well, sorta):

Anybody remember S. J. Gould's take on this guy?





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Dey can't 'andle my riddim.

  
improvius



Posts: 807
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 22 2007,12:31   

Well, this is certainly an odd topic.  But I'm afraid I can't resist an opportunity to show off some of the "kids".  So, just for the heck of it...



Above is Saki.  She's a nearly-full-grown anthill python (Antaresia perthensis) from GoP's favorite continent.  This species has the distinction of being the world's smallest python.



Above is Lefty, another anthill.  Lefty is only a couple of months old in this pic, and has just eaten - um - something.



And above we have Sophie, one of our Savu pythons (Liasis sauvensis or Liasis mackloti savuensis, depending on whom you ask).  The Savus are an extreme example of geogrpahic isolation.  While closely related to some of the other Aussie pythons, this particular species has the distinction of being found (outside of captivity, of course) only on the tiny Savu Islands in Indonesia.

There are more pics here at tinypythons.com if anyone cares.

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Quote (afdave @ Oct. 02 2006,18:37)
Many Jews were in comfortable oblivion about Hitler ... until it was too late.
Many scientists will persist in comfortable oblivion about their Creator ... until it is too late.

  
Crabby Appleton



Posts: 250
Joined: May 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 23 2007,01:44   

Quote (Steviepinhead @ Jan. 20 2007,20:12)


Let's see if it works for me!  Ah, yes!  Thanks, Henry, I didn't want it for an avatar, just as a cool "old" animal!  These Mississippian shell pieces are something I'm drenching myself in at the moment (it's all Crabby's fault...), though this particular gorget is thought to be more Hopewell or Adena.

Maybe I should add that this design comes from an Indian gorget dug up in the American midwest.  IOW, around 1,000 years ago, there were jaguars (or ocelots) roaming the Mississippi bottomlands.  Which I thought was kinda cool.

My fault?

Oh, OK. You're welcome Mr. Pinhead.

I like this one better but it's MIA.


  
Crabby Appleton



Posts: 250
Joined: May 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 23 2007,01:50   

Found one of these inadvertantly during a NANFA survey and now that I know what to look for have not found another.


  
Faid



Posts: 1143
Joined: Mar. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 23 2007,09:32   

Here's my favorite kind of plankton:



--------------
A look into DAVE HAWKINS' sense of honesty:

"The truth is that ALL mutations REDUCE information"

"...mutations can add information to a genome.  And remember, I have never said that this is not possible."

  
The Ghost of Paley



Posts: 1703
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 23 2007,11:53   

Faid:

The image isn't showing on my screen.

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Dey can't 'andle my riddim.

  
Henry J



Posts: 4565
Joined: Mar. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 23 2007,12:11   

Probably something to do with those %20 things in the file directory path in place of blanks in the name of a subdirectory. What bright person sticks blanks in subdirectory name, anyway. Sure it's allowed nowadays, but it's still a dumb thing to do.

  
Steviepinhead



Posts: 532
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 27 2007,16:12   

Quote (Crabby Appleton @ Jan. 22 2007,23:44)

Quote (Steviepinhead @ Jan. 20 2007,20:12)


Let's see if it works for me!  Ah, yes!  Thanks, Henry, I didn't want it for an avatar, just as a cool "old" animal!  These Mississippian shell pieces are something I'm drenching myself in at the moment (it's all Crabby's fault...), though this particular gorget is thought to be more Hopewell or Adena.

Maybe I should add that this design comes from an Indian gorget dug up in the American midwest.  IOW, around 1,000 years ago, there were jaguars (or ocelots) roaming the Mississippi bottomlands.  Which I thought was kinda cool.

My fault?

Oh, OK. You're welcome Mr. Pinhead.

I like this one better but it's MIA.



Ah, yes, a Spiro mound--or closely related--"Chunkey player" gorget.  The player--who has both human and bird attributes, so may be some kind of visualization of a cosmic personage or rmyth character--is wearing all kinds of cool ceremonial regalia, including the fringey thing hanging down from his waist-sash, which current scholarship suggests is a decorated scalp...!

I meant "fault" in a good way (hey, I'm a lawyer: where would I be without "fault"?)!  Actually, I meant your "1491" thread--to which I must someday return--was at least partially responsible for sending me down a road of reading and, ahem, research that has led me in the direction of these shell gorget and cup designs (generally manifestations of the "Southeastern Ceremonial Complex" associated with the Mississippian "Moundbuilder" societies, though the jaguar gorget is earlier...).

Anyway, thanks for the link to another swell gorget!

  
Steviepinhead



Posts: 532
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 27 2007,16:37   

Crabby, I saw that a collection of pottery was "missing in action," but that collection did not seem to include this gorget.

What's your "MIA" reference mean?

  
someotherguy



Posts: 398
Joined: Aug. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 27 2007,16:50   

I'm a rather large fan of all the great apes.  Here's a picture I took during a recent trip to the San Diego Zoo of an orangutan named Satu:



I'm also rather fond of this (admittedly off-centered) bonobo photo that I took:

:D

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Evolander in training

  
Henry J



Posts: 4565
Joined: Mar. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 29 2007,13:56   

Satu reminds me of Harry in the movie "Harry and the Hendersons" - I suppose the costume designers for that movie may have used orangutan faces as a starting point when designing Harry.

Henry

  
Faid



Posts: 1143
Joined: Mar. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 29 2007,15:49   

Quote (Faid @ Jan. 23 2007,09:32)
Here's my favorite kind of plankton:


whoops! Here's Eleutheria, guys.

--------------
A look into DAVE HAWKINS' sense of honesty:

"The truth is that ALL mutations REDUCE information"

"...mutations can add information to a genome.  And remember, I have never said that this is not possible."

  
The Ghost of Paley



Posts: 1703
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 29 2007,16:49   

Faid:
   
Quote
Here's Eleutheria, guys.


You just like it cause it's got a Greek name...... ;)

By the way, if anyone wishes to discuss the evo significance of their creature, all the better.

Here's Dr. Hunter's favorite:



I can't believe how big these things get:



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Dey can't 'andle my riddim.

  
phonon



Posts: 396
Joined: Nov. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 29 2007,19:19   

These little buggers are just cool.

Meerkat.

And Sea Otters will eat your entrails on their tummies!


Falcons are pretty cool.


The Lizard that squirts blood.
http://palaeoblog.blogspot.com/2006....eo.html



The Giant Centipede that can catch and eat a bat is awesome.
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=8313878609430213933

But nothing on this Earth can compete with puppies.



And Chameleons are pretty cool too. (Puppy pics from: http://dailypuppy.com/ )

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With most men, unbelief in one thing springs from blind belief in another. - Georg Christoph Lichtenberg

To do just the opposite is also a form of imitation. - Georg Christoph Lichtenberg

  
J-Dog



Posts: 4402
Joined: Dec. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 29 2007,21:40   

(Dembskius Ignoramus Americanus)

Well, something's not working right, I guess it's me, so my picture of Bill The Beaver will be lost.  Darn, that vermin was ugly too.

I will ty again another time.

We now return you to your regularly scheduled post.

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Come on Tough Guy, do the little dance of ID impotence you do so well. - Louis to Joe G 2/10

Gullibility is not a virtue - Quidam on Dembski's belief in the Bible Code Faith Healers & ID 7/08

UD is an Unnatural Douchemagnet. - richardthughes 7/11

  
Crabby Appleton



Posts: 250
Joined: May 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 31 2007,01:07   

Quote (Steviepinhead @ Jan. 27 2007,16:37)
Crabby, I saw that a collection of pottery was "missing in action," but that collection did not seem to include this gorget.

What's your "MIA" reference mean?

I knew what you meant about "fault" Stevie. My reply was tongue in cheek (sans smiley, sorry).

I can't seem to quickly navigate back to the page I got the MIA quote from but that gorget was stolen.

I want to read 1491 and discuss it but time is short and priorities are priorities. I did take my grandson sledding on the local mound a week ago.

  
don_quixote



Posts: 110
Joined: Aug. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 31 2007,05:58   

GoP,

Yeah, Ligers are scary creatures!


Phonon,

Are you sure that final picture of yours contains a puppy? Could be a chameleon pretending to be a puppy.


Personally, my favourite animal is the invisible pink unicorn (pic below).












.

  
Steviepinhead



Posts: 532
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 31 2007,19:14   

Crabby, bummer about the gorget.  I'm against capital punishment, except for littering and this kind of thing...

But sledding is cool...!

  
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